Doron Shinar

Doron Shinar is an Israeli writer.

Doron's first published work was "Chalonot Nemuchim" (Low Windows View), edited by Yael Shachnai, published in 2016 by Kinneret Zmora-Bitan. The book caught the public attention and received positive reaction by the critics. It was also cited on Haaretz's Best Sellers list for several weeks. The book tells the incredible story of a small restaurant in down-town Tel Aviv in the '80s, its unusual boss, Grandma Jenya, and her lost and then found grandchild that grew to be a person with unique superpowers and talents.

In 2017, his second book "Don’t Count Chickens", edited by Haya Landa, was published by Arie Nir/Modan. It is a fiction mystery and espionage book, taking place in countries along the Silk-Road, involving corrupted local officials, Israeli technology, American v. Russian financing, the Israeli Ambassador, his dead lover, and his ex-Mossad wife.

In 2018 his third book "The Sordid History of the Pasternak Family", edited by Tamar Bialik, was published by Kinneret, Zamora-Bitan, Dvir. The book conveys the imaginary history of an uncommon, unorthodox family of crooks and its unbelievable fate. The book received excellent reviews, including in the Israel Hayom literature supplement, where Shinar was described as "a unique and outstanding new voice in Hebrew literature."

In 2019 his fourth book, "Always Her" (Tamid Hee) edited by Tamar Bialik, was published by Kinneret, Zamora-Bitan, Dvir. The book tells the painful love story of Joseph (Yumme) and Edna (Din-Din), starting as early as Youth Camp where they first met and continuing… well, forever. The story transpires in the '80s and is rooted deeply in the south of Israel.

His fifth book "A Soldier's Pursuit" (Mah Chayal Mevakesh), edited by Tamar Bialik, was published by Kinneret, Zamora-Bitan, Dvir in 2021. The book tells the story of young men recruited to serve in the IDF, but its core is the combat aspects (as one might expect) but on human interaction, dreams, love and desire for affection, human connection, camaraderie, and forgiveness.  It’s a very personal and even intimate story told from the eyes of a young man in the late '70s (although not based on a singular true story).

Doron was born in Tel Aviv. He grew up on a Kibbutz in the Negev. As a child, he wrote for the youth magazine Maariv LaNoar, and published in the (then) children's magazines Haaretz Shelanu and Mishmar LeYeladim. At a later stage he wrote for "Chotam", supplement of the then daily newspaper Al Hamishmar, edited by Rubik Rosenthal, in which he had a column called "Reshimot Shchorot" (blacklists) of pseudo-current stories.

Doron spent a few years of his youth in London, returned to the Kibbutz, then Served in the IDF as a combat soldier, completing his engagement with the rank of Major. He studied at the Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University, and received Attorney license as a Lawyer in 1989. In 1994, he left his position as a partner at a partner in a leading law firm and founded his own law firm. As a lawyer, he practiced commercial law, specializing in finance, capital markets and corporate law. In 2008  he retired from full practice in law to establish and manage his own business initiatives in different areas of the world, including Uzbekistan, the country which its regime and business environment inspired "Don’t Count Chickens". Today Doron serves as a director on the board of few companies and as counsel to investors seeking to invest in Israel, but he devotes most of his time to his literature career.

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Doron lives in Tel Aviv, married to Ruth, and is the father of two daughters and recently became a grandfather to one granddaughter.